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Arrest after police shoot man dead responding to hoax 'swatting' call

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Police and industry officials say the death Thursday in Wichita may have been the result of a practice called "swatting", in which a person makes up a false report to get a SWAT team to descend on an address.

However, the suggestion that "heightened awareness" should naturally make a SWAT team member trigger-happy only makes sense if your officers are, to put it bluntly, not particularly well-trained in deescalation or high-pressure situations. Family members identified the man as Andrew Thomas Finch, CNN affiliate KAKE reported.

"The incident is a nightmare for everyone involved including the family and our police department".

The officer who fired the fatal shot, a seven-year veteran of the force, has been placed on paid administrative leave, which is department policy.

Police are now investigating the shooting as a case of swatting.

"We were told that someone had an argument with their mother and dad was accidentally shot and that now that person was holding brother, sister and mother hostage", Wichita Police Deputy Chief Troy Livingston said. As it is laid out on Twitter, this man threatened to swat the other, with the intended victim giving his attacker a false address. The hoaxer gave an interview with social media blogger Keem Star. Some swatters use a teletypewriter (TTY) relay - a phone system created for people who are deaf - to place 911 calls. Snitching is when your neighbor is selling weed & you jealous that he bought a brand new auto with that cash so you turn him into the police. I'm exhausted of this shit, he need to be thrown in jail.

When officers arrived, they surrounded the house where the alleged shooting had happened.

ZooMaa went on to share screenshots of apparent threats that Swautistic had sent him on December 29.

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A relative of Andrew Finch's told the Wichita Eagle that the victim didn't play video games.

Mr Livingston called the incident "tragic and senseless". A male came to the front door. Fearful that Finch was going for a firearm, an officer eventually discharged one round, killing the father of two, said Livingston. "So that's the information we were working off of", Livingston said.

Staff at the community center called police. "I heard a huge gunshot go off".

On that fateful evening, it's believed one of the Call of Duty players sent some address details to a known hoax caller, who we now know as Tyler "SWAuTistic" Raj Barris. The intended victim of the swatting gave a false address, that was close to his own, so it would appear real.

"Someone tried to swat me and got an innocent man killed."

The police and FBI are investigating whether an argument between two players of the online game Call of Duty may have lead to the death of an unarmed man in Kansas on Thursday. The loser of that game got "salty", according to the account. No one should die because a stranger lost a $1.50 video game wager.

"We woke this morning to disgusting news about an innocent man losing his life", Shannon Gerritzen, a UMG vice president, said in an email to The Associated Press.

Swatting dates back to at least the early 2000s, and the Federal Bureau of Investigation first warned the public about it in 2008. Or they call local non-emergency numbers instead of 911, according to 911.gov.

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